Peridynamics

Hello,

I have a question about the PMB peridynamic model. More precisely,
the value of the c constant (c=18K/PI*delta^4) is valid for a isotropic expansion loading. But is it the same for any kind of loading?
Thank you in advance for your answer,

Hugo

Mike Parks or Rezwan may be able to answer.

Steve

The micromodulus function "c" can be modified for anisotropic materials such as fiber reinforced composites. Look at the following paper for further clarification.

MODELING DYNAMIC FRACTURE AND DAMAGE IN A FIBER-REINFORCED COMPOSITE LAMINA WITH PERIDYNAMICS
Wenke Hu, Youn Doh Ha, Florin Bobaru

--- Rezwan

Ok but I am interested only in isotropic materials.

And the micromodulus as the value of c=18K/PI*delta^4 just for a isotropic expansion loading.

I would like to know if the value is the same for an isotropic material but with another loading, like traction for example.

your question is a bit confusing.

for bond based pd model some info on surface effect (i.e. traction etc) is given in the PhD dissertation: "PERIDYNAMIC THEORY FOR PROGRESSIVE FAILURE PREDICTION IN HOMOGENEOUS AND HETEROGENEOUS MATERIALS by Bahattin Kilic"on page-68-75

Ok but I am interested only in isotropic materials.

And the micromodulus as the value of c=18K/PI*delta^4 just for a isotropic expansion loading.

I would like to know if the value is the same for an isotropic material but with another loading, like traction for example.

2014-06-24 17:20 GMT+02:00 rezwan rahman <[email protected]…16…>:

Hugo,

The constant c below will, in 3D, give exactly the same strain energy density as a classical elastic isotropic homogeneous body with a bulk modulus of k and a Poisson ratio of 0.25, under isotropic expansion. (This equivalence is how the constant c was derived.) However, for the PMB model, the peridynamic energy density will not exactly match the classical energy density for more general deformations.

– Mike