Query regarding calculation of temperature/atom

I wanted to know that how can I compute temperature/atom. Please give me some suggestion.

I am using the following dump commands and I have got the following message as below:

dump snap all cfg 100 dump.config.*.cfg id type xs ys zs c_cn mass c_kie

dump_modify snap color brown 0.647 0.164 0.164

ERROR: Illegal dump_modify command (…/dump.cpp:787)

please help me correcting the dump_modify command inputs. I wanted to know how to write the command to change the color of atoms using dump_modify command.

I am using the following dump commands and I have got the following message
as below:

dump snap all cfg 100 dump.config.*.cfg id type xs ys zs c_cn mass c_kie

dump_modify snap color brown 0.647 0.164 0.164

ERROR: Illegal dump_modify command (../dump.cpp:787)

please help me correcting the dump_modify command inputs. I wanted to know
how to write the command to change the color of atoms using dump_modify
command.

*please* read the documentation more carefully. this command applies
to the image dump *only*.

coloring atoms in an external visualization program has to be done
through the tools in that software, not in lammps.

axel.

Thank you for reply.

I wanted to know the better formula for getting the absolute
temperature of an atom of a solid. As I have compute ke/atom. I have
used 3/2 KT to find the temperature of an atom of a solid. But some
temperature values are quite high in the order of million Kalvin
(1.6e06). Please give me some suggestion.

I wanted to know the better formula for getting the absolute
temperature of an atom of a solid. As I have compute ke/atom. I have

first off, the concept of temperature in its thermodynamic definition
only makes sense in a system that has a (near) infinite number of
degrees of freedom. what you compute is based on the assumption of
equipartitioning of the kinetic energy where you assume that every
degree of freedom has (on average) the same kinetic energy. then you
end up with 1/2 kT per DOF or 3/2 kT per atom. so the notion of a
temperature per atom is a bit "daring".

used 3/2 KT to find the temperature of an atom of a solid. But some
temperature values are quite high in the order of million Kalvin
(1.6e06). Please give me some suggestion.

do your math correctly?

axel.

p.s.: the guy's name was Lord Kelvin, hence the name of the unit, not
to be confused with Calvin (from Calvin and Hobbes, or the theologist
if you are more into that). being accurate is part of being a
scientist, isn't it?