source file for defining units

Hello,
I am using a new parameter in potential formula describing the atoms interactions in my simulation. In my simulation, I use lj unit which uses dimensionless parameters. so I am trying to find the source file in which I can define the dimensionless form of my parameter. anyone knows the name of the file?

Thanks

Sorry, but your question makes no sense and there is too little information about what files you have changed or want to change where and why you need to “define the dimensionless form”.

Please explain in more detail and also why you think that this is connected to the parameter being dimensionless.

thanks,
Axel.

Hello
Thanks for your answer, well I have written a file as a magnetic dipole potential and compile it in source directory. in this potential file I used a vector quantity of magnetic momentum which is not listed in https://lammps.sandia.gov/doc/units.html. while I use lj units in the simulation I need to define how to make it unitless .But I couldn’t find which file contains converting quantities to unitless ones in lj units.

thanks

Hello
Thanks for your answer, well I have written a file as a magnetic dipole potential and compile it in source directory. in this potential file I used a vector quantity of magnetic momentum which is not listed in https://lammps.sandia.gov/doc/units.html. while I use lj units in the simulation I need to define how to make it unitless .But I couldn’t find which file contains converting quantities to unitless ones in lj units.

that is now how this works in LAMMPS. if you are using reduced units, all properties have to be entered in reduced units and thus there are no conversions needed inside of LAMMPS. if you look at the Update::set_units() function in the file update.cpp, you will see that rather than converting individual properties into something internal, there are some factors defined to convert computed properties like 0.5mv**2 for a given set of units to the corresponding energy unit and similarly for other typical computations. for reduced units, however, all of those factors would be 1.0.

axel.