Can Lammps simulate the movement of wear particles?

Dear Lammps users,

I would like to know whether Lammps can simulate the movement and transport process of wear particles (metal particles with particle sizes of 1-100um) in the lubricating oil medium(in the pipe or friction pair)? I want to get the trajectory, distribution, velocity and other state parameters of the particles(As shown in the figure below).
5264003B@...8073....png86018E2D@...8074....png03D72F92@...8075....jpg

Best Regards,
Wenhua Hu

Dear Lammps users,

I would like to know whether Lammps can simulate the movement and transport process of wear particles (metal particles with particle sizes of 1-100um) in the lubricating oil medium(in the pipe or friction pair)? I want to get the trajectory, distribution, velocity and other state parameters of the particles(As shown in the figure below).

you are looking at this from the wrong perspective. LAMMPS implements models for MD-style propagation, those can be applied to many different problems.

thus the first thing you need to look for are suitable models and matching parameters. that you can best find through carefully surveying the relevant published literature. once you have one or more models and parameter sets, you can look into whether LAMMPS does support the necessary features. that you can figure out through reviewing the manual. finally, you should check out what kind of data you can accumulate and whether you can/should be using analysis features provided by LAMMPS, or use some (self-written) post-processing tool or a combination of those.

axel.

5264003B@...8073....png

86018E2D@...8074....png

03D72F92@...8075....jpg

For what it’s worth, you should probably be looking into openFOAM rather than LAMMPS. That being said, Axel’s advice is spot on. I’m guessing if you look at the methods used (from the pictures you’ve given at least) that ‘computational fluid dynamics/cfd’, ‘point particle method’, ‘lagrangian particle tracking’, perhaps ‘one-way coupling’, drag models, RANS equations, etc. are all brought up in the literature - you should be looking at. The relevant models are important to know when evaluating options if you’re looking for something out of the box. If you don’t know what exactly you are trying to do, what assumptions you are making, and what the underlying models are, well meaning folks unfamiliar with your problem can easily lead you a stray - and you might be none the wiser until someone confronts you about it in a presentation or in a manuscript review.

As for what softwares you should be considering, understanding the literature should also give you a pretty good idea as to what open source options you have. Even searching for fluent competitors on google should give you good ideas - my first result (https://www.resolvedanalytics.com/theflux/comparing-cfd-software).